Cloud forms according to the international classification
Read Online
Share

Cloud forms according to the international classification with photographs of clouds.. by Meteorological office.

  • 869 Want to read
  • ·
  • 32 Currently reading

Published by H.M.S.O. in London .
Written in English


Book details:

The Physical Object
Pagination12, 20 plates :
Number of Pages20
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20870140M

Download Cloud forms according to the international classification

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

Get this from a library! Cloud forms according to the international system of classification: including introductory historical remarks, international cloud definitions and descriptions, and a selection of cloud pictures. [Ivan Ray Tannehill; United States. Weather Bureau.;]. Get this from a library! Codes for cloud forms and states of the sky according to the international system of classification: Prepared by the Weather bureau Committee on clouds and cloud forms. [United States. Weather Bureau.]. cloud classification A scheme of distinguishing and grouping clouds according to their appearance, and, where possible, to their process of formation. The one in general use, based on a classification system introduced by Luke Howard in , is that adopted by the World Meteorological Organization and published in the International Cloud Atlas. Eddy Diffusion Cloud System Regular Polyhedron Genetical Classification International Definition These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm by: 1.

The classification of clouds into types was first proposed by Luke Howard in and we largely use the same system today. This splits clouds into three main types - stratus, cumulus and cirrus. Clouds are continually changing and appear in an infinite variety of forms. The classification of clouds is based on a book written by Luke Howard, a. The modern classification scheme used by the UK Met Office, with similar schemes used elsewhere, classifies clouds according to the altitude of cloud base, there being three altitude classes: low; mid level and high. Within each altitude class additional classifications are defined based on four basic types and combinations thereof. International Cloud Atlas (also Cloud Atlas) is a cloud atlas that was first published in and has remained in print since then. Its initial purposes included aiding the training of meteorologists and promoting more consistent use of vocabulary describing clouds, which were both important for early weather first edition featured color plates of color photographs, then still.   Codes for cloud forms and states of the sky according to the international system of classification. Prepared by the Weather bureau Committee on clouds and cloud forms: Codes for cloud forms and states of the sky according to the international system of classification. This book is available with additional data at Biodiversity Heritage Pages:

Handbook of Classification I. ORGANIZATION OF INFORMATION A. Bases of Classification A variety of rationales have been developed over the years to subdivide our classification files into searchable units. Collections of art based on each of the following rationales can be found in the U.S. Patent Classification sys tem as it exists today. Cloud Classification and Characteristics Clouds are classified according to their height above and appearance (texture) from the ground.. The following cloud roots and translations summarize the components of this classification system. 1) Cirro-: curl of hair, high.3) Strato-: layer. 5) Cumulo-: heap. 2) Alto-: mid. 4) Nimbo-: rain, precipitation. Clouds may be classified by form and by height. Luke Howard ( - ), a British pharmacist was the first to describe cloud forms using Latin terms such as cirrus, cumulus or division of clouds into ten basic cloud forms, or cloud genera is based on his publications. Cloud genera are further subdivided into cloud species (desribing shape or structure) and cloud variety. Ivan Ray Tannehill (Ma – May 2, ) was a commissioned US Army Lieutenant at Fort Story, Virginia and soon after World War I, became a forecaster with the United States Weather Bureau and a prolific writer, focusing on text on hurricanes remained the defining work on the topic from the late s into the early s.